Cutting rent increases

Cutting rent increases

A landlord may increase rent for an existing renter once a year. The maximum increase for 2020, the maximum rental increase is 2.6%, to accommodate for inflation. Renters must be given three full months’ notice prior to a rent increase.

Learn more

Helping families
and seniors afford rent

Helping families and seniors afford rent

More subsidies are available through the Rental Assistance Program (RAP) and Shelter Aid For Elderly Renters (SAFER) to help low-income British Columbians live in the communities they love.

Learn more

Cracking down on renovictions

Cracking down on renovictions

A landlord cannot renovict their renters simply because it would be easier or more economical to complete the work. When renovations are necessary, renters will have the choice to stay in their homes or, for major renovations, be compensated to move or terminate a tenancy.

Learn more

Making sure everyone
follows the rules

Making sure everyone follows the rules

To take action against landlords and renters who are repeat or serious offenders, a new Compliance and Enforcement Unit has been created within the Residential Tenancy Branch.

Learn more

Building and funding new affordable rental homes

Building and funding new affordable rental homes

Through the largest investment in housing in BC’s history, more than 11,000 affordable rental homes are underway or complete today.

Learn more

Preventing unfair rent increases at lease renewal time

Preventing unfair rent increases at lease renewal time

To make sure lease renewal doesn’t come with an unfair rent hike, renters who stay in the same unit can’t be asked to agree to a rent increase simply for signing a new lease. Rent can only be increased once a year.

Learn more

Frequently Asked Questions

Q

What should I do before moving out?

Q

I have my Residential Tenancy Decision – now what?

Q

What should I know before I rent a new home?

Q

What do I do if my landlord has stopped providing a service or facility?

Q

What do I do if my landlord won’t allow me to have guests?

Q

How do I dispute a rent increase?

Q

What do I do if my rental unit or property needs repairs?

Q

What do I do if my landlord doesn’t follow proper process for entering my rental unit?

Q

How do I sublet or re-assign the tenancy agreement to another renter?

Q

What should I do if I’ve received a notice to end tenancy?

Q

What are the rules for getting a deposit back after the tenancy ends?

Renters Resources

Deposits

Deposits

Whether you’re a landlord or a renter, be sure you understand the process for deposits at the beginning and end of a tenancy.

Learn more

Issuing and receiving notices

Issuing and receiving notices

Make sure you know the rules surrounding how and when a renter can serve their notice.

Learn more

Enforcement process

Enforcement process

There are serious consequences for renters and landlords who do not comply with B.C.’s tenancy laws.

Learn more

Tenancy Agreements

Tenancy Agreements

Landlords are required to prepare a written agreement for every tenancy. Even if a landlord doesn’t prepare one, the standard terms of a tenancy agreement still apply.

Learn more

Repairs

Repairs

Landlords and renters share responsibility for maintaining the rental property. Failing to fulfill responsibilities could mean that one party has to reimburse the other for repair or maintenance expenses.

Learn more

Forms and Fees

Forms and Fees

Depending on the situation in a tenancy, there are specific forms that will help ensure the process is completed properly.

Learn more

Changing your mind about ending a tenancy

Changing your mind about ending a tenancy

It’s okay if a landlord and renter change their minds about ending a tenancy – as long as they agree to it in writing.

Learn more

Ending a Tenancy

Ending a Tenancy

Learn about circumstances and process for ending a tenancy in B.C.

Learn more

Solving disputes

Solving disputes

Dispute resolution is the formal process for resolving disagreements between landlords and renters – it’s similar to a court proceeding.

Learn more